Private security companies worry about licensing

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Private Security Industry Association President Cosmas Mutava (center) interacts with General Secretary Delano Kiilu (right) and Treasurer Peter Maina. [David Njaaga, Standard]

A standoff is looming in the private security sector with the expected publication of all licensed companies by the end of July.

The government, through the Private Security Regulatory Authority (PRSA), announced in December 2019 its intention to undertake re-verification and re-authorization of all private security providers.

The companies, however, protested and petitioned various branches of government, including parliament, where they managed to suspend control.

But in a confidential note, PSRA chief executive Fazul Mohamed has now ordered all department heads and the audit committee to submit “all pending audit reports” to his office for compilation.

“In addition, you are required to compile and submit the list of all private security companies along with the names of directors and senior management who have not taken regulatory security training,” it reads. in the note of July 5, 2021.

The President of the Private Security Industry Association, Cosmas Mutava, expressed his surprise at the new development and wondered when the verification and training of managers had been carried out.

“I am not aware of any plans to publish and publish the companies,” he said. The standard.

“We have so much discussion and even commitments going on, including the audit criteria, the so-called training, and the program to go through.”

In March 2020, private security companies were granted a stay after activist Okiya Omtatah went to court to stop the screening, questioning the timing and public participation in the process.

The case is pending before the High Court.

Judge Anthony Mrima also issued protective orders on March 10, 2021, prohibiting the PSRA from issuing letters claiming to be registration certificates pending the hearing and decision of the case.

According to the government’s plan, the check was to last three months until March 31, 2020.

Private security providers were expected to submit their registration certificates, identification documents, Kenya Revenue Authority PIN codes and certificates of good conduct for each of their directors, partners, trustees and shareholders.


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